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Timeless

Reviewing: J.K. Rowling Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows  |  Rating:
Wilson Alba By Wilson Alba on
Badge: Author | Level: 1 | Fiction & Creative Expertise:

"Get over 'Harry Potter' already!” a friend told me recently. I just finished re-reading the final book, and I'm having a really hard time writing a review. I liked it, a lot. (Great start no?)

But when I read it again, so many details and layers were revealed, that may or may not be intentional. But it further reinforced my opinion that the book (and the series) is, without a doubt an enduring classic.

2007 was a year of change for me, many things happened. Life wasn’t what it used to be. This year I witnessed death at work and in my family.

One of our officemates got killed in a car accident, March last year. My uncle died of lung cancer months after his diagnosis in July. The thing about death is it’s something that we all inevitably face, the one thing constant in life, but its also one aspect of our mortality that very few lived to tell about. (Does that make sense?) It’s the unknown, the last frontier and that makes it something that a lot are scared about. I know I am.

I read somewhere that the series took on a different direction when J.K. Rowling’s mother died of multiple sclerosis. Writing Harry Potter could’ve been a form of therapy for her grieving. I hoped it helped her, because it had me hooked and is one facet of the series that I really liked. It’s a poignant take on our fragility and transience, and how we must know what we truly value because of the temporal nature of life. She always said that Death is the main theme of the series. I'm sure it is.

As a finale, I couldn’t have asked for more. Sure there were epic battles, and a lot of fan service. It’s not perfect but if there is one thing that Rowling hasn’t lost sight of, it’s the series’ and the book’s plot. The characters are alive and the message clear. Its not poetry, that’s for sure but it’s accessible. I admire the simplicity of the prose (and the complexity of the plot) and because of that it’s timeless.